The 10 best Hollywood horror movies of all time

The best Hollywood horror movies are terrifying beasts, lurking within the dark corners of streaming services, able to pounce on unsuspecting prey. they're going to leave you unable to sleep without a nightlight, and presumably popping your head under the covers to stay out of sight. they're scary, yes, but also remarkable feats of cinema that are a number of the foremost influential movies of all time. 

We're spent an entire lot of your time hiding behind the sofa to bring you this list of the simplest horror movies of all time. they're a number of the creepiest movies around, but also a number of the foremost well made. Look, as an example , to The Shining, Stanely Kubrick's masterpiece that has left an enormous , terrifying shadow on cinema. Even today, The Shining holds up against modern contemporaries with east, and filmmakers still ape Kubrick's stylings. Our list, though, is not just the classics. Yes, we've selected John Carpenter, but also Jordan Peele; Alfred Hitchcock's name sits alongside Ari Aster. The thing all of them share in common? they're still the absolute best horror movies going. So, sit back, and prepare to possess a sleepless night.
The 30 best horror movies of all time, The best horror movies are terrifying beasts, lurking within the dark corners of streaming services, able to pounce on unsuspecting prey. they're going to leave you unable to sleep without a nightlight, and presumably popping your head under the covers to stay out of sight. they're scary, yes, but also remarkable feats of cinema that are a number of the foremost influential movies of all time.   We're spent an entire lot of your time hiding behind the sofa to bring you this list of the simplest horror movies of all time. they're a number of the creepiest movies around, but also a number of the foremost well made. Look, as an example , to The Shining, Stanely Kubrick's masterpiece that has left an enormous , terrifying shadow on cinema. Even today, The Shining holds up against modern contemporaries with east, and filmmakers still ape Kubrick's stylings. Our list, though, is not just the classics. Yes, we've selected John Carpenter, but also Jordan Peele; Alfred Hitchcock's name sits alongside Ari Aster. The thing all of them share in common? they're still the absolute best horror movies going. So, sit back, and prepare to possess a sleepless night., 10. 28 Days Later (2002)  28 Days Later (2002) The movie: Let’s get the undead elephant out of the space first. Danny Boyle’s horror is a zombie movie. Yes, they will run, but it’s important to consider this horrible lot as a part of an equivalent genealogy as Romero’s finest. Maybe they wouldn’t have Christmas dinner together but they’d at least send cards and maybe some gift cards for the necrotic kids. The important thing is, no matter their speed, these zombies are still the destroyers of worlds. When Jim (Cillian Murphy) wakes up in a hospital bed - a lot like our friend Karl in The Walking Dead - he staggers out into an apocalyptic London that will never be the same again.   Why it’s scary: 28 Days Later seems like a nightmare. Complete with a very often heartbreaking also as heart pounding soundtrack, this seems like the truest glimpse at the fashionable British apocalypse as Jim and his fellow survivors quest for safety in Scotland. The Infected are truly horrifying, survivors are suspicious, and the fallen British landscape is an impressive feat of cinematography. Throw in excellent performances from everyone involved and 28 Days Later is a gory feast for the eyes and the heart.   9. Scream (1996) Scream (1996) The movie: By the late '90s, horror was looking a touch tired. The masked slasher trope was staggering along in a dire need of a cup of very strong espresso. What it got instead was Wes Craven’s Scream which, despite being parodied into Inception levels of postmodern irony since, reinvigorated the genre with its perfect blend of knowing comedy and scares. Neve Campbell, Rose McGowan, and Drew Barrymore as teenagers talking fluent horror movie while being picked off by a genre-obsessed serial killer? Oh go on… Add in Courtney Cox - at the giddy heights of Friends fame - as intrepid news reporter Gale Weathers and Scream may be a modern horror classic.  Why it’s scary: Just because something is self-referential doesn’t mean it can’t be truly terrifying. The Scream mask, supported Munch’s painting, may need been twisted into stoned bliss by Scary Movie, but it still manages to unsettle and thrill. Scream’s scares remain unpredictable too. Victims fall to the present slasher’s knife with disturbing regularity and as we grow attached to our genuinely likeable quipping heroes, the top game becomes all the more stressful as we wonder who will survive to the credits. Craven’s Nightmare on Elm Street scare talents guarantee terror all the way to the end. Why don't you, liver alone, eh?  8. Alien (1979) Alien (1979) The movie: Arguably one among the best fantasy movies ever made also just happens to be one among the best horror movies too. It doesn't seem fair, does it? The original Alien from Ridley Scott sends the crew of the Nostromo to research a distress signal from an abandoned alien spaceship as innocently as any gang of hormonal teenagers headed off to a foreign cabin within the woods. And, just like those teenagers, not many of them are going to survive to tell the tale. Sigourney Weaver makes for the ultimate Final Girl here.   Why it's scary: There's nowhere more horribly isolated than a spaceship light years faraway from home and Giger's alien is as terrifying a monster as you'll wish for. The dread goes much deeper than teeth and claws though. This creature represents a multilayered, bottomless pit of psychosexual horror, its very form praying on a raft of primal terrors. Plus, the visual ambiguity of Scott's direction during the final act is an absolute masterclass in 'What's that in the shadows?' tension. Ignore the recent xenomorph packed movies, close up the lights and watch this and Aliens to reignite your passion for truth horror of Scott's vision.   7. Jaws (1975) Jaws (1975) The movie: Before Jurassic Park, before ET, and an eternity before the majority of the cast of Ready Player One were brought screaming into existence, there was Jaws, Steven Spielberg’s toothy horror. And yes, this is a horror movie. Jaws, one among the first blockbusters on account of the amount of individuals literally queuing round the block only to escape the cinema in terror, is horrifying. It doesn’t matter that the shark looks a little ropey now when he gets up close and personal, the story of Amity Island’s gory summer season as Chief Brody desperately tries to keep swimmers out of the water is the stuff of horror legend. And, let’s face it, you’re already humming the score.   Why it’s scary: the rationale that Jaws haunts you long after the credits roll is straightforward . One viewing and this particularly vindictive shark can potentially ruin every trip to the seaside. Every gentle paddle as waves lap at your toes. Every skinny dip. Every precarious trip onto the ocean wave on anything smaller than the Titanic. Spielberg doesn’t pull any punches either. Dogs die, children die, heads float out of sunken boats. No one is bound to see the credits here, especially not the three men who head bent sea to slay the beast. With legendary performances and a monster which will never leave you, Jaws is that the ultimate creature feature.  6. Halloween (1978) The movie: Who'd have thought an old Star Trek mask might be so terrifying? Director John Carpenter created a contemporary classic when he gave his villain a blank William Shatner mask to wear while he stalks babysitters round the fictional town of Haddonfield, Illinois. The movie created another icon, too, in Jamie-Leigh Curtis, who'd become both a scream queen in her title , and therefore the template for all final girls to follow. Who cares if the primary scene makes no sense? this is often a movie that starts with a toddler murdering his sister while wearing a clown mask and if that's not scary, you would like your horror fan status revoked immediately.  Why it's scary: just about the first stalk-and-slash, Halloween set standards that have rarely been matched. Carpenter composes his shots to stay you constantly guessing, blending both claustrophobia and fearful exposure, often at an equivalent time, to make a deeply uneasy sense of vulnerability wherever you're and whatever is occurring . Also, that soundtrack. Composed by Carpenter himself. there's a reason that pounding doom-synth remains the soundtrack for oppressive horror. As an excellent follow up too, get the 2018 sequel into your eyes. The new Halloween removes all those messy other sequels and does an ideal job of showing the important trauma of growing up as a victim of the form himself.   5. The Exorcist (1973) The Exorcist (1973) The movie: And here we are into the highest five of this best horror movies list. It almost feels predictable now that William Friedkin’s masterpiece, now in its 40s, remains looming near the highest of numerous horror features. But watch The Exorcist and you’ll understand why. this is often the story of Regan, the daughter of a successful movie actress who within the future"> at some point occupies herself in the basement by twiddling with a Ouija . If you've got ever wondered why your parents don’t want you twiddling with this innocuous looking toy, a young Linda Blair probably has something to try to to with it. Using the Ouija as gateway, an gatecrasher takes root within the female child and therefore the rest, because the titular exorcist arrives, is cinema history.   Why it’s scary: very similar to The Shining, The Exorcist isn't safe. Unpredictable, visceral, and primeval, this is often a movie supported the only of premises but even in it’s happiest moments, is completely anxiety inducing. With a now near mythical production, William Friedkin’s relentlessness for ‘authenticity’ meant his actors were frozen during a refrigerated bedroom, physically pulled across sets to duplicate the demon’s physical prowess, and, of course, splattered with warm pea soup. The result's a horror movie that you’ll probably never say you actively enjoy, but will end up rewatching, just to feel the sheer terror of Friedkin’s evil ghost train altogether its disturbing glory once more .  4. Hereditary (2018) Hereditary (2018) The movie: house is where the guts is. It’s also where the worst horror lives, hiding just beneath the surface of the right family life. A harrowed Toni Collette leads Ari Aster’s very first (!) feature because the mother of a grieving family. The death of her own mother has sent shockwaves through their home and, to stay this review spoiler free, the longer term isn’t looking exactly, errr, bright either.   Why it’s scary: It’s fair to mention that at no point does Hereditary feel safe. Nowhere during its two hour run time does one desire you'll stop and take a breath, or maybe make a guess on what’s coming next. is that this a supernatural movie? is that this an exercise in grief, almost like the Babadook? Is there even a difference between these two ideas? Every shot of Collette’s artist painstakingly creating miniature dioramas seems like a threat and each awkward conversation between the 2 teenagers of the family leaves a sickening feeling within the pit of your stomach. Why? there is no putting your finger on the precise reason. it'd have split cinema audiences but Hereditary may be a tour de force of recent horror which will leave you reeling long after its gruelling third act. We’re just not getting to tell you why.  3. The Thing (1982) The Thing (1982) The movie: Perhaps you’ve been buried in snow and have missed John Carpenter’s ultimate creature feature. Entirely understandable. Why don’t you come closer to the hearth and defrost? The title might sound hokey but The Thing remains one among the foremost gloriously splattery and tense horrors of all time as a gaggle of usa citizens at an Antarctic research station - including Kurt Russell’s R.J MacReady - combat an alien, well, thing that infects blood. it'd begin removing the canine companions - there’s no got to inspect DoesTheDogDie.com this point around - but it really doesn’t stop there.  Why it’s scary: The Thing may be a movie of physicality. There’s intense paranoia and horror sprinkled in because the party begins to disintegrate because the infection spreads but it’s the very real, oh-so-touchable nature of the nasties at work here that’s so disturbing. the sensible effects - the responsibility of a young Rob Bottin and uncredited Stan Winston - are truth stars as arms are eaten by chests, decapitated heads sprout legs, and bodies are elongated and stretched. The macabre vision of those murderous monsters at work isn't anything but true nightmare fuel.  2. The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974) The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974) The movie: Some movie titles are vague, letting you gradually compute their meaning because the narrative slowly unfurls ahead of your eyes sort of a delicate flower in tea. Then there’s Tobe Hooper’s grim, sweaty horror movie. there's nothing delicate here. Its titular weapon must be sharp but The Texas Chainsaw Massacre may be a blunt instrument of horror. this is often a tour de force of violence as five children leave the security of the planet behind and journey into dusty Americana. What they find in one house once they innocently enter trying to find gas is such death and depravity that the movie remains , decades on, a disturbing endurance test.   Why it’s scary: The funny - and there's humour here, it’s just not there on the primary watch - thing about the Texas Chainsaw Massacre is that there’s actually little or no blood. There’s the long-lasting Leatherface, inspired by Ed Gein in his fleshy face covering, and a death scene involving a hook which will cause you to look down and check your body remains there, but little or no viscera. Gore are some things that your brain mentally splashes everywhere to undertake and affect the horror on screen here, to deal with the screams of pure terror and iconic disturbing soundtrack. It’s suffered many clones over the years, to not mention a Michael Bay produced glossy moneymaker remake, but nothing can replicate the sheer desperation and violent honesty of The Texas Chainsaw Massacre. it might almost be dangerous to undertake .   1. The Shining (1980) The Shining (1980) The movie: albeit you haven’t watched Stanley Kubrick’s masterpiece, you’ll know of The Shining. You’ll know Jack Nicholson’s (apparently ad-libbed) “Heeeeeeeere’s Johnny” and you would possibly even remember that if you’re handed the keys to room 237 during a hotel, you would possibly want to modify it for an additional suite. But what if you've got n’t? What if you have been snowed up during a mysterious hotel with only hedge animals for company? Well, The Shining follows a person and his family as he takes on the role of winter caretaker at a resort hotel referred to as The Overlook. as long as this is often a Stephen King adaptation (albeit one that that horror author hates such a lot that he made his own movie), the winter months don’t go well. The Overlook Hotel, it seems , doesn’t adore people.  Why it’s scary: there is a reason that this is often the highest of this veritable pile of screams. The Shining feels evil. From Jack Nicholson’s deranged performance as a person descending into murderous insanity to Kubrick’s relentless direction as we hypnotically follow Danny navigating the hotel corridors on his trike, this is often a movie that never allows you to feel safe. Like Hereditary earlier during this list, The Shining is like being driven by a drunk mad man. What’s coming next? Lifts of blood? Chopped up little girls? the fear that lurks within the bath of room 237? this is often not a horror movie made from boo scares or cheap tricks, Kubrick’s film may be a lurking, dangerous beast that stays with you long after your TV has gone dark.
The 10 best Hollywood horror movies of all time

10. 28 Days Later (2002)

 28 Days Later (2002)
The movie: Let’s get the undead elephant out of the space first. Danny Boyle’s horror is a zombie movie. Yes, they will run, but it’s important to consider this horrible lot as a part of an equivalent genealogy as Romero’s finest. Maybe they wouldn’t have Christmas dinner together but they’d at least send cards and maybe some gift cards for the necrotic kids. The important thing is, no matter their speed, these zombies are still the destroyers of worlds. When Jim (Cillian Murphy) wakes up in a hospital bed - a lot like our friend Karl in The Walking Dead - he staggers out into an apocalyptic London that will never be the same again. 

Why it’s scary: 28 Days Later seems like a nightmare. Complete with a very often heartbreaking also as heart pounding soundtrack, this seems like the truest glimpse at the fashionable British apocalypse as Jim and his fellow survivors quest for safety in Scotland. The Infected are truly horrifying, survivors are suspicious, and the fallen British landscape is an impressive feat of cinematography. Throw in excellent performances from everyone involved and 28 Days Later is a gory feast for the eyes and the heart. 

9. Scream (1996)

Scream (1996)
The movie: By the late '90s, horror was looking a touch tired. The masked slasher trope was staggering along in a dire need of a cup of very strong espresso. What it got instead was Wes Craven’s Scream which, despite being parodied into Inception levels of postmodern irony since, reinvigorated the genre with its perfect blend of knowing comedy and scares. Neve Campbell, Rose McGowan, and Drew Barrymore as teenagers talking fluent horror movie while being picked off by a genre-obsessed serial killer? Oh go on… Add in Courtney Cox - at the giddy heights of Friends fame - as intrepid news reporter Gale Weathers and Scream may be a modern horror classic.

Why it’s scary: Just because something is self-referential doesn’t mean it can’t be truly terrifying. The Scream mask, supported Munch’s painting, may need been twisted into stoned bliss by Scary Movie, but it still manages to unsettle and thrill. Scream’s scares remain unpredictable too. Victims fall to the present slasher’s knife with disturbing regularity and as we grow attached to our genuinely likeable quipping heroes, the top game becomes all the more stressful as we wonder who will survive to the credits. Craven’s Nightmare on Elm Street scare talents guarantee terror all the way to the end. Why don't you, liver alone, eh?

8. Alien (1979)

Alien (1979)
The movie: Arguably one among the best fantasy movies ever made also just happens to be one among the best horror movies too. It doesn't seem fair, does it? The original Alien from Ridley Scott sends the crew of the Nostromo to research a distress signal from an abandoned alien spaceship as innocently as any gang of hormonal teenagers headed off to a foreign cabin within the woods. And, just like those teenagers, not many of them are going to survive to tell the tale. Sigourney Weaver makes for the ultimate Final Girl here. 

Why it's scary: There's nowhere more horribly isolated than a spaceship light years faraway from home and Giger's alien is as terrifying a monster as you'll wish for. The dread goes much deeper than teeth and claws though. This creature represents a multilayered, bottomless pit of psychosexual horror, its very form praying on a raft of primal terrors. Plus, the visual ambiguity of Scott's direction during the final act is an absolute masterclass in 'What's that in the shadows?' tension. Ignore the recent xenomorph packed movies, close up the lights and watch this and Aliens to reignite your passion for truth horror of Scott's vision. 

7. Jaws (1975)

Jaws (1975)
The movie: Before Jurassic Park, before ET, and an eternity before the majority of the cast of Ready Player One were brought screaming into existence, there was Jaws, Steven Spielberg’s toothy horror. And yes, this is a horror movie. Jaws, one among the first blockbusters on account of the amount of individuals literally queuing round the block only to escape the cinema in terror, is horrifying. It doesn’t matter that the shark looks a little ropey now when he gets up close and personal, the story of Amity Island’s gory summer season as Chief Brody desperately tries to keep swimmers out of the water is the stuff of horror legend. And, let’s face it, you’re already humming the score. 

Why it’s scary: the rationale that Jaws haunts you long after the credits roll is straightforward . One viewing and this particularly vindictive shark can potentially ruin every trip to the seaside. Every gentle paddle as waves lap at your toes. Every skinny dip. Every precarious trip onto the ocean wave on anything smaller than the Titanic. Spielberg doesn’t pull any punches either. Dogs die, children die, heads float out of sunken boats. No one is bound to see the credits here, especially not the three men who head bent sea to slay the beast. With legendary performances and a monster which will never leave you, Jaws is that the ultimate creature feature.

6. Halloween (1978)

The movie: Who'd have thought an old Star Trek mask might be so terrifying? Director John Carpenter created a contemporary classic when he gave his villain a blank William Shatner mask to wear while he stalks babysitters round the fictional town of Haddonfield, Illinois. The movie created another icon, too, in Jamie-Leigh Curtis, who'd become both a scream queen in her title , and therefore the template for all final girls to follow. Who cares if the primary scene makes no sense? this is often a movie that starts with a toddler murdering his sister while wearing a clown mask and if that's not scary, you would like your horror fan status revoked immediately.

Why it's scary: just about the first stalk-and-slash, Halloween set standards that have rarely been matched. Carpenter composes his shots to stay you constantly guessing, blending both claustrophobia and fearful exposure, often at an equivalent time, to make a deeply uneasy sense of vulnerability wherever you're and whatever is occurring . Also, that soundtrack. Composed by Carpenter himself. there's a reason that pounding doom-synth remains the soundtrack for oppressive horror. As an excellent follow up too, get the 2018 sequel into your eyes. The new Halloween removes all those messy other sequels and does an ideal job of showing the important trauma of growing up as a victim of the form himself. 

5. The Exorcist (1973)

The Exorcist (1973)
The movie: And here we are into the highest five of this best horror movies list. It almost feels predictable now that William Friedkin’s masterpiece, now in its 40s, remains looming near the highest of numerous horror features. But watch The Exorcist and you’ll understand why. this is often the story of Regan, the daughter of a successful movie actress who within the future"> at some point occupies herself in the basement by twiddling with a Ouija . If you've got ever wondered why your parents don’t want you twiddling with this innocuous looking toy, a young Linda Blair probably has something to try to to with it. Using the Ouija as gateway, an gatecrasher takes root within the female child and therefore the rest, because the titular exorcist arrives, is cinema history. 

Why it’s scary: very similar to The Shining, The Exorcist isn't safe. Unpredictable, visceral, and primeval, this is often a movie supported the only of premises but even in it’s happiest moments, is completely anxiety inducing. With a now near mythical production, William Friedkin’s relentlessness for ‘authenticity’ meant his actors were frozen during a refrigerated bedroom, physically pulled across sets to duplicate the demon’s physical prowess, and, of course, splattered with warm pea soup. The result's a horror movie that you’ll probably never say you actively enjoy, but will end up rewatching, just to feel the sheer terror of Friedkin’s evil ghost train altogether its disturbing glory once more .

4. Hereditary (2018)

Hereditary (2018)
The movie: house is where the guts is. It’s also where the worst horror lives, hiding just beneath the surface of the right family life. A harrowed Toni Collette leads Ari Aster’s very first (!) feature because the mother of a grieving family. The death of her own mother has sent shockwaves through their home and, to stay this review spoiler free, the longer term isn’t looking exactly, errr, bright either. 

Why it’s scary: It’s fair to mention that at no point does Hereditary feel safe. Nowhere during its two hour run time does one desire you'll stop and take a breath, or maybe make a guess on what’s coming next. is that this a supernatural movie? is that this an exercise in grief, almost like the Babadook? Is there even a difference between these two ideas? Every shot of Collette’s artist painstakingly creating miniature dioramas seems like a threat and each awkward conversation between the 2 teenagers of the family leaves a sickening feeling within the pit of your stomach. Why? there is no putting your finger on the precise reason. it'd have split cinema audiences but Hereditary may be a tour de force of recent horror which will leave you reeling long after its gruelling third act. We’re just not getting to tell you why.

3. The Thing (1982)

The Thing (1982)
The movie: Perhaps you’ve been buried in snow and have missed John Carpenter’s ultimate creature feature. Entirely understandable. Why don’t you come closer to the hearth and defrost? The title might sound hokey but The Thing remains one among the foremost gloriously splattery and tense horrors of all time as a gaggle of usa citizens at an Antarctic research station - including Kurt Russell’s R.J MacReady - combat an alien, well, thing that infects blood. it'd begin removing the canine companions - there’s no got to inspect DoesTheDogDie.com this point around - but it really doesn’t stop there.

Why it’s scary: The Thing may be a movie of physicality. There’s intense paranoia and horror sprinkled in because the party begins to disintegrate because the infection spreads but it’s the very real, oh-so-touchable nature of the nasties at work here that’s so disturbing. the sensible effects - the responsibility of a young Rob Bottin and uncredited Stan Winston - are truth stars as arms are eaten by chests, decapitated heads sprout legs, and bodies are elongated and stretched. The macabre vision of those murderous monsters at work isn't anything but true nightmare fuel.

2. The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974)

The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974)
The movie: Some movie titles are vague, letting you gradually compute their meaning because the narrative slowly unfurls ahead of your eyes sort of a delicate flower in tea. Then there’s Tobe Hooper’s grim, sweaty horror movie. there's nothing delicate here. Its titular weapon must be sharp but The Texas Chainsaw Massacre may be a blunt instrument of horror. this is often a tour de force of violence as five children leave the security of the planet behind and journey into dusty Americana. What they find in one house once they innocently enter trying to find gas is such death and depravity that the movie remains , decades on, a disturbing endurance test. 

Why it’s scary: The funny - and there's humour here, it’s just not there on the primary watch - thing about the Texas Chainsaw Massacre is that there’s actually little or no blood. There’s the long-lasting Leatherface, inspired by Ed Gein in his fleshy face covering, and a death scene involving a hook which will cause you to look down and check your body remains there, but little or no viscera. Gore are some things that your brain mentally splashes everywhere to undertake and affect the horror on screen here, to deal with the screams of pure terror and iconic disturbing soundtrack. It’s suffered many clones over the years, to not mention a Michael Bay produced glossy moneymaker remake, but nothing can replicate the sheer desperation and violent honesty of The Texas Chainsaw Massacre. it might almost be dangerous to undertake . 

1. The Shining (1980)

The Shining (1980)
The movie: albeit you haven’t watched Stanley Kubrick’s masterpiece, you’ll know of The Shining. You’ll know Jack Nicholson’s (apparently ad-libbed) “Heeeeeeeere’s Johnny” and you would possibly even remember that if you’re handed the keys to room 237 during a hotel, you would possibly want to modify it for an additional suite. But what if you've got n’t? What if you have been snowed up during a mysterious hotel with only hedge animals for company? Well, The Shining follows a person and his family as he takes on the role of winter caretaker at a resort hotel referred to as The Overlook. as long as this is often a Stephen King adaptation (albeit one that that horror author hates such a lot that he made his own movie), the winter months don’t go well. The Overlook Hotel, it seems , doesn’t adore people.

Why it’s scary: there is a reason that this is often the highest of this veritable pile of screams. The Shining feels evil. From Jack Nicholson’s deranged performance as a person descending into murderous insanity to Kubrick’s relentless direction as we hypnotically follow Danny navigating the hotel corridors on his trike, this is often a movie that never allows you to feel safe. Like Hereditary earlier during this list, The Shining is like being driven by a drunk mad man. What’s coming next? Lifts of blood? Chopped up little girls? the fear that lurks within the bath of room 237? this is often not a horror movie made from boo scares or cheap tricks, Kubrick’s film may be a lurking, dangerous beast that stays with you long after your TV has gone dark.

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